Be a Heo from Zero!

Hello everyone!

Are you intrested in learning Japanese numbers? 
We have created this article to help you with numbers and number system in Japanese.

This session will help you in being a Hero from Zero in Japanese numbers!

Table of Contents

The Goal of this Session

Learn how to say numbers from zero to almost millions in Japanese.

Brief Explanation

This session will guide you in counting numbers from Zero to trillion in Japanese.
Please download the interactive PDF, have a glance and begin the session below.

Numbers 0~10
Note that Zero in Japanese is often used as ‘ゼロ’ (as it is a borrowed word from a foreign language, it is written in katakana)
And reading ‘れい’ is Japanese reading often used when using decimal numbers.
For example 0.7 = れいてんなな (dot in Japanese is てん) or ゼロてんなな

Next, observe that Four, Seven and Nine also has two readings.
The readings written in the bracket are used for special purposes, which we will see in our further sessions whenever required.

Numbers 11~100
Counting up to 100 is counting like 1 to 10.
The Hint to remember here is: multiples of 10 + number

For example, 
12 is (10+2)じゅう + = じゅう

30 is (30+0)さん + じゅう = さんじゅう
56 is (50+6)さん + じゅう+ろく = さんじゅうろく and so on.

Numbers 101~1000
100 in Japanese is ひゃく.
The Hint to remember here is: multiples of 100 + number

Observe that,
105 is (100+5)ひゃく + =ひゃく
148
is (100+40+8)ひゃく+ よんじゅう はち =ひゃくよんじゅうはち
200 is (2+100) + ひゃく =ひゃく
But,
300 becomes (3+100)さん + ひゃく = さんびゃく
600 becomes (6+100)ろく + ひゃく = ろっぴゃく
800 becomes (8+100)はち + ひゃく= はっぴゃく

Numbers 1001~10,000
1000 in Japanese is 
せん.
The Hint to remember here is: multiples of 1000 + number
Observe that,
1009 is (1000+9) which becomes
せん+きゅう =せんきゅう
1996 is (1000+900+90+6)
which becomes
せんきゅうひゃく+きゅうじゅうろく =せんきゅうひゃくきゅうじゅうろく
2532 is (2000+500+30+2)
which becomes
せんひゃく+さんじゅう =せんひゃくさんじゅう

4000 is (4+1000)よん+せん = よんせん
But,
3000 becomes (3+1000)さん+せん=さんぜん and
8000 becomes (8+1000)はち+せん = はっせん

Numbers 10,000~1,000,000,000,000
10,000(ten thousand) in Japanese is いちまん.
1,000,000(million) in Japanese is ひゃくまん.
100,000,000(hundred million) in Japanese is いちおく.
1000,000,000(billion) in Japanese is じゅうおく.
1000,000,000,000(trillion) in Japanese is いっちょう.

Videos

1. Video lessons

Coming soon……….

2. Fun way to Memorize!!

To memorize the greetings and phrases, we have provided a video link that will help you to learn musically! It will also help you in developing your listening skills because songs can be useful in language learning as they provide a format for memorizing vocabulary and rhythm of the language.

So, we suggest you to become a kid again and use your creativity to widen your language learning potential.
Try counting from 1 to 10 and 10 to 1 along with the song.

 

Practice Test

Japanese numbers test 002 express japanese

Note :

  1. Answers to this test will be sent to the registered mail, along with the test results. Also, you can check your results in My account upon sign up.
  2. If you score over 70% you will receive an appreciation certificate. 

 

Download Free PDF

To learn more, please download the Free PDF.

CONTAINS-

  1. Interactive PDF to learn and Revise.
  2. Practice Test (answers included )

NOTE-

Interactive PDF works only on a desktop Adobe reader.

Did You know ?

The Japanese word for the number four has two pronunciations, ‘yon’ and ‘shi’.
Shi’ can also mean ‘death’; because ‘shinu’ is the verb which means ‘to die’.
As a result, the number four is considered unlucky, so they usually skip it when numbering hotel and hospital floors.

 

Recommended books

For more practice, we recommend the books listed below. Click on any book to get a detailed review. Also check out some popular dictionaries and Flip cards that can boost your study method.

To summarize

Today we learnt about numbers and number system.
Now, you can also learn Days of the week, Months and Dates in Japanese.

Until then, おげんきで [which means take care!]. またね [which means see you!].

 

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